Hello there~! This is a multifandom blog, but I also post and reblog random text posts, clothes, food and some weird stuff!

jenntalksnature:

I had to make this post to go along with this video, because really, Crested pigeons (Ocyphaps lophotes, top three photos) are freaking pretty.  I’ve also included another Australian Columbid that I’m jealous of, the Common Bronzewing (Phaps chalcoptera, bottom three photos).

Image credits from top to bottom:
Lip Kee
Birds Central
Archies Archive
Ian Montgomery
Ákos Lumnitzer
Ian Montgomery

holly-draws-skeletons:

Hey! I made a spooky ghost for you guys! 
It’s transparent!

holly-draws-skeletons:

Hey! I made a spooky ghost for you guys! 

It’s transparent!

Important things to consider with your OCs:

thesapphirerose:

  • How they would react upon accidentally walking into a glass door
  • Their reaction to having their name spelt wrong on a Starbucks drink
  • What kind of vines they would make
  • Their reaction to your favourite character
  • How they would play The Sims
  • What their finishing move would be

sorry for not being active the past few days! our internet was being a dick again and i couldn’t get online at all

so yeah. i’m back now

wizard-fallen-angel:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

shootingstarsafterdark:

ChaosLife - Homo Hint

With comments too great not to include. You should check the heck out of that webcomic series either way 8D

The comments on this are every bit as fabulous as the actual comic :D

This would be a lot easier than having to figure it out yourself

xaylu-art:

I can’t stop drawing Alma Torran stuuuuuff

veneficae9:

Ohtaka’s backstage 234

veneficae9:

Ohtaka’s backstage 234

gokunobaka:

Ja’far gettin ready for selling things :D!

I love him so much in SnB <3 He’s such a cutie ;y; <3

plays

fyeaharttips:

Concise overview on how light behaves on different forms

missnouveau:

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]
petticoatruler:

don’t
expect them to be able to go out on a whim
expect them to have lives just like yours
expect them to always be available
demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
tell other people about their illness(es)
suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.
do
understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
be supportive and understand their limitations
ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
remember that they are a person, not an illness
listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say
I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.


The dietary and physical restriction thing is SO important and I feel SO loved when people take my dietary restrictions into thought. Also good to note, restaraunts (or at least the ones here in Portland) are getting really good at knowing their ingredients and being able to tell you. Also a lot of the Thai/Chinese/Japanese places here are getting rid of MSG and it makes me so happy.

missnouveau:

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]

petticoatruler:

don’t

  • expect them to be able to go out on a whim
  • expect them to have lives just like yours
  • expect them to always be available
  • demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
  • offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
  • act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
  • challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
  • baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
  • tell other people about their illness(es)
  • suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
  • Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
  • ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.

do

  • understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
  • be supportive and understand their limitations
  • ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
  • ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
  • tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
  • remember that they are a person, not an illness
  • listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say

I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

The dietary and physical restriction thing is SO important and I feel SO loved when people take my dietary restrictions into thought. Also good to note, restaraunts (or at least the ones here in Portland) are getting really good at knowing their ingredients and being able to tell you. Also a lot of the Thai/Chinese/Japanese places here are getting rid of MSG and it makes me so happy.

How do you make the flowers for the flower crown? like specifically what material is it? Its super cool and I want to make one I just don't know what I need.
urhotmess

merlin-bunny:

steelplatedhearts:

soresoftheopenheart:

Hmm, I just reblogged it from another site, but I think I can help you in terms of what to buy and how to do it. If you click the link, it’ll take you to the complete photo post that shows you what you need. In any event, here’s the list:

  • Nail polish
  • Floral wire, a thin bendable wire is ideal. 26 Gauge is fine. imageimage
  • Floral Tape            image
  • Wire cutters/scissors
  • a pencil or cylindrical object to wrap the petals around
  • Ribbon (optional)

DIRECTIONS

  1. First, you’re gonna need to make the crown. You can do this by using the wire you already have or you can use an old headband or anything that you like that resembles a headpiece. Thicker wire is also fine for this step.image       As you can see, OP twisted two pieces of wire together and left loops at the end (to attach the ribbon). Then they covered it in brown floral tape.
  2. The second step is to make the flowers. Using your pencil/cylindrical object, twist the wire around it to create a ‘petal’. Repeat this until you have at least a couple of petals. 3-6 is usually fine, it’s really your call. image
  3. SLIGHTLY bend the petals back to create a natural looking petal.image
  4. After you are satisfied with the shape of your petals, cut out your flower, leaving some wire left to attach it to your crown. 
  5.  Repeat the first few steps and make the rest of your flowers.
  6. Take one of your flowers and CAREFULLY apply nail polish to it, one petal at a time. Think of it like making bubbles. It may be easier to pour the nail polish in a flat plate and dip it, or dip the entire flower into the polish.imageRepeat this for all your remaining flowers.
  7. Twist the two ends of your flowers together to form a ‘stem’.image
  8. Wrap the stems with floral tape, preferably with the same color you used in the base of the crown.imageRepeat this for all your remaining flowers.
  9. The third step will be attaching the flowers to your crown. You can do this a few ways. One way is to wrap the stems around the crown. Another way is to just wrap the stems with floral tape as you go along, like the OP did.imageDo this until all your flowers have been attached to your crown.
  10. At this point, you can tie the ribbons to the loops like OP did, or decorate it any other way you like. :)

image

Enjoy your new floral crown!

TIPS

  • You can purchase most of the items in Walmart, Michael’s or any craft or flower store. You can also order it online. :)
  • REMEMBER, this tutorial is just a guide. If you don’t want to use brown floral tape or if you prefer using the green floral wire, don’t be afraid to change it up. You can use any color or material your heart desires.

I’ll refer you to an ask where I gave a few tips. ASK by starry-ponds

And here are some completed flower crowns from some lovely tumblr users. :)  Alyssa & Rebekka

And here is the original link to the post. It’s in Russian.

Sorry for replying late. I hope this helps you with making your own crown. :)

for the people asking about the nail polish flowers!

oh man i remember when my mom used to make these…. so that’s how she did it… muwhahahahahahahahaaa

If this isn’t an entrance to a fairy world then I don’t know what is…

Fairy Glen, Isle of Skye, Scotland, April 2014

(Source: -little-owl-)

ink-its-art:

Stunning black tattoos by Jonny Breeze. He is a tattoo artist working between London and Brighton.

lagos2bahia:

So many men have internalized the lie that they have uncontrollable sex drives, and no way to control their anger. They aren’t ashamed of their abusive behavior because they see it as a something natural to them and maybe even central to their masculinity. It’s scary as hell.

memoircomics:

nannaia:

This is a hairstyle timeline that is meant to cover the Taishō era (1912-1926). However the dates for many reference photographs were rather vague, so some might actually fall into Shōwa era (1926-1989). Regrettably I couldn’t cover EVERY single hairstyle from this period so please consider this to be a brief overview. There are no Geisha, Maiko, etc featured here; they will be covered in another fashion timeline someday.

Some interesting notes about Meiji-Taisho era from Liza Crihfield Dalby’s Kimono: Fashioning Culture (1993)

·         “Men and women of Meiji had gulped up Western culture with all the indiscriminate enthusiasm of new converts. By Taishō, Japanese sensibilities vis-à-vis the West were much smoother. This was Japan’s political equivalent of the … social scene of the American Roaring Twenties. Japanese born during Taishō would enter adolescence as modern boys and girls. Significantly, women opened their closets to Western clothing during this decade. Kimono has lost space ever since.” (pg. 124)

·         “By 1915 Japan was beginning to feel itself a world-class nation, more confident of its military strength and social development. Ordinary Japanese were inclined to look at their society in light of how life might be bettered by adapting foreign ideas, or made more interesting by acquiring foreign fashions. Borrowing from the West was of course not new, but it had now become a more reciprocal and respectable process.” (pg. 124)

WOMEN’s HAIR:

·         In the Meiji era “a few women cropped their hair, but these courageous souls were simply regarded as weird” and indecent (pg. 75)

·         “If cutting the hair short was too radical [in Meiji Japan], as public reaction attests, women’s hair did gain a new option in the sokugami style, a pompadour resembling the chignons worn by Charles Dana Gibson’s popular Gibson girls. The further the front section, or ‘eaves,’ of the hair protruded, the more daring the style. The sokugami style bunched the hair, coiling it in a bun at the crown of the head. Unlike traditional coiffures, sokugami did not require the heavy use of pomade, pins, bars, strings, and false hair to hold its shape. Its appeal was promoted as healthier and more rational – hence, more enlightened- than the old ways.” (pg. 75)

the people in these photos are some of the most beautiful i’ve ever seen?!?!?!?!?!??!

manatopia.org